Important Information: Phage Therapy & Antibiotic Resistance Congress is postponed to May 17-18, 2018

The organizing committee published today an important information about Phage Therapy & Antibiotic Resistance Congress: the congress is postponed to May 17-18, 2018.

Please take on consideration that the program, topics discussed and the list of speakers will be the same.

Speakers confirmed their participation and you can find the preliminary agenda by clicking here.

If you already registered to the congress, your registration is automatically moved to the new date.

Please don’t hesitate to contact us for further information.

Developing phage therapy for lung infections

Dr. Sandra-Maria Wienhold, from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany will talk about “Bacteriophage therapy for lung infections: recent scientific advances”  during Targeting Phage & Antibiotic Resistance Congress which will be held at October 2 – 3, 2017 at Florence, Italy.

Dr. Sandra-Maria Wienhold, veterinarian and researcher in Prof. Martin Witzenrath´s lab (lunglab.de) at the Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, dedicates her scientific work to the development of novel therapeutic options for lung diseases, including pneumonia and ventilator induced lung injury. Using experimental in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo techniques the Witzenrath Lab aims at translating novel achievements of basic science into clinical perspectives. One of the current projects aims at providing scientific evidence for the use of bacteriophages produced under GMP conditions against multiresistent gramnegative bacteria. Preclinical evaluations are under investigation and clinical studies will be performed.

 

Development of Infection-responsive surface coatings for bacteriophage delivery in the catheterised urinary tract: strategic presentation of Targeting Phage & Antibiotic Resistance Conference

During Targeting Phage & Antibiotic Resistance Conference 2017, Dr Nzakizwanayo from School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Brighton, United Kingdom will talk about “Development of Infection-responsive surface coatings for bacteriophage delivery in the catheterised urinary tract”.

According to Dr Nzakizwanayo: “Indwelling urethral catheters (IUC) are widely used for long-term bladder management but are often complicated by acquisition of infection. Proteus mirabilis is a particular problem in this regard, and forms extensive crystalline biofilms on catheter surfaces that obstruct urine flow and lead to serious complications such as pyelonephritis, septicaemia and shock. To address this clinical need, we have developed a novel infection-responsive surface coating for urinary catheters, which responds to elevated pH indicative of P. mirabilis infection. We demonstrate the ability of this coating to provide both a visual early warning of infection, and deliver a therapeutic dose of bacteriophage to control catheter blockage. This potentially “theranostic” coating system is a promising strategy for the deployment of phage therapy and other relevant antimicrobial compounds at local sites within the urinary tract at the exact time when the intervention is needed.”

More information on www.tid-site.com

Pr Brian Jones will present his study on “Control of catheter associated biofilms through efflux inhibition”

Pr Brian Jones, from school of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Brighton, United Kingdom will present his study on “Control of catheter associated biofilms through efflux inhibition“.

According to him: “Proteus mirabilis poses particular problems in the care of individuals undergoing long-term urethral catheterization. This organism forms extensive crystalline biofilm structures on catheter surfaces that block urine flow, leading to serious complications such as pyelonephritis, septicemia and shock. We have previously shown that efflux systems are important for P. mirabilis biofilm formation on catheters, and mutants defective in particular systems are less able to block catheters, highlighting potential therapeutic targets. Subsequently, we screened a range of existing drugs already used in human medicine to identify potential efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs). Molecular modelling indicated selected EPIs showed strong interaction with efflux systems related to biofilm formation, and these compounds were also able to attenuate P. mirabilis biofilm formation and catheter blockage in laboratory models of catheter associated UTI. Overall this suggest efflux inhibition may be a valid approach to control catheter blockage, and existing medicines have the potential to be repurposed for control of bacterial biofilm formation.”

How to use lytic bacteriophages in the treatment of biofilm-forming bacteria involved in prosthetic joint infections?

Dr. Mariagrazia Di Luca from the Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin Hospital, Berlin, Germany was invited to give a presentation during Florence Targeting Phage & Antibiotic Resistance Congress 2017. Her presentation will present the role of the lytic bacteriophages in the treatment of biofilm-forming bacteria involved in prosthetic joint infections.

According to Dr Di Luca, the infections involving medical implants represent a unique challenge due to the formation of biofilm in which bacteria are up to a thousand times more resistant to antibiotics than their planktonic counterparts. Lytic bacteriophages, when active against biofilms, represent a promising treatment, particularly against drug resistant bacteria. 

The present communication will focus on the anti-biofilm activity of both commercially available and newly isolated bacteriophages against bacterial strains relevant in the context of prosthetic joint infection.

For more information about Dr Di Luca, please click here.

New Antibiotic Resistance Genes Found in Soil Microbes

Farm soil harbors abundant genes related to antibiotic resistance in microbes, including some that have never been identified in human pathogens, according to a study published Friday (June 16) in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. Researchers identified novel gene products, including peptides and enzymes, that can provide resistance to classes of antibiotics used to combat a range of bacterial infections, including those that cause strep throat and chlamydia.

“There are certainly, in the environment, cryptic antibiotic resistance genes that have yet to be transferred to human pathogens,” study coauthor Edward Topp, an environmental scientist at University of Western Ontario, London, and also Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, tells The Scientist in an email.

Topp and colleagues collected soil samples from farm plots in London, Canada, that the team had exposed to antibiotics for up to 16 years. The researchers extracted DNA from the samples, then cloned fragments of specific sequences into a strain of E. coli sensitive to antibiotics. When the researchers put the altered E. coli in petri dishes with various antibiotics, they saw some colonies were able to grow, indicating the transfected DNA fragments conferred resistance. Through sequencing, they identified 34 new antibiotic resistance genes.

“The particularly surprising result is the discovery of a gene that encodes for an unusual small proline-rich polypeptide that confers resistance to the macrolide antibiotics, very important in human and animal medicine,” Topp says. Macrolide antibiotics are used to treat strep throat and pneumonia, as well as chlamydia and syphilis. The mechanism by which the newly identified gene confers resistance to macrolide antibiotics is not yet known.

With advanced genomic techniques, studies such as Topp’s are helping researchers understand the diversity of resistance compounds in the environment, says bacterial epidemiologist Kimberly Cook of the United States Department of Agriculture. “What we are learning is that the genes that confer resistance are wide ranging and the mechanisms for resistance are even wider ranging than previously thought,” says Cook, who was not involved in the current study.

Microbiologist Rafael Cantón of the Ramón y Cajal Institute for Health Research in Madrid notes that antibiotic resistance genes are naturally present in soil bacteria, and some may work in ways not yet identified in clinical bacteria. “If we understand these resistance mechanisms, we can search for new antibiotics that might not be affected for these mechanisms,” he says in an email to The Scientist.

Indeed, natural environments may serve as hotspots for the evolution of antibiotic resistance, Topp and colleagues write in their study. Farmland, for instance, is exposed to antibiotics by the spread of manure from chicken, pigs, and other livestock, which are often given antibiotics to maintain their health. Human waste, also used as fertilizer, can contain antibiotics as well. A growing number of studies suggest that such dumping animal and human waste and other anthropogenic activities are increasing the abundance of antibiotic resistance genes in the environment, though it’s not clear if pathogens can recruit antibiotic resistance genes through horizontal gene transfer from the environment.

The best way to ensure pathogens can’t recruit antibiotic resistance genes from the environment is by not putting them there in the first place, Topp notes. He suggests a push for continued reduction of antibiotic use in food animal production through regulatory and economic measures, which would reduce the amount of antibiotics that enter into the agricultural system through the spread of manure.

“This is very clear,” writes Cantón. “If we reduce the presence of antibiotics in the environment, we will reduce selection of resistant bacteria. Antibiotics kill or inhibit susceptible bacteria but not resistant ones. Hence, overload of antibiotics in the environment enriches resistant populations.”

C. Lau et al., “Novel antibiotic resistance determinants from agricultural soil exposed to antibiotics widely used in human medicine and animal farming,” Applied and Environmental Microbiology, doi:10.1128/AEM.00989-17, 2017.

This news was selected from the-scientis.com

New generations of antibiotics for MDR pathogens from old antibiotic classes and new resistance breaker

Prof. Gian Maria Rossolini from University of Florence, Italy will participate to Targeting Antibiotic Resistance 2017 Congress and will talk about his research on “New generations of antibiotics for MDR pathogens from old antibiotic classes and new resistance breaker”.

According to Prof. Rossolini: “The modification of old antibiotic scaffolds and the combination of old antibiotics with new resistance breakers (e. g. beta-lactamase inhibitors) have proved among the most successful strategies to combat antibiotic resistance in the short/medium-term range. This presentation will focus on how these strategies are now providing us with new powerful antibiotics for MDR pathogens, and on which are the challenges encountered with these new agents”.

If you would like to know more, please register to Targeting Antibiotic Resistance 2017 on www.tid-site.com

 

Enterococci may have evolved antimicrobial resistance millions of years ago

Enterococci bacteria, like those shown here, can be resistant to common antibiotics, making infections difficult to treat. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Enterococci bacteria are the bane of hospitals, causing thousands of multidrug-resistant infections in patients each year. Now, researchers have traced evidence of the bacteria’s evolutionary history back 425 million years and theorize that the same traits that allow the bacteria to thrive in hospitals likely emerged when they were carried onto land in the guts of the world’s first terrestrial animals. The study was funded in part by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health.

Researchers at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard examined DNA from 24 species of enterococci, taken from the guts of a wide variety of animal and human hosts. The team calculated the average rate of genetic change within enterococcal species and compared genes of existing enterococci to those of related, non-enterococci bacteria. The analysis allowed the researchers to build an evolutionary timeline to estimate when key enterococci traits emerged. They then checked this timeline against the fossil record of terrestrial animal evolution.

All enterococci sampled were resistant to a common set of stresses–including antibiotics, disinfectants, drying and starvation–suggesting that the ancestors of all enterococci also shared these abilities. Enterococci appear to have developed these traits at around the same time that terrestrial animal life evolved. The researchers theorize that the ancestors of all enterococci lived in the guts of prehistoric aquatic animals, and as their hosts left the sea around 425 million years ago, the bacteria were carried along. Simultaneously, they evolved the traits needed to survive introduction into the harsher environment of dry land.

The researchers note that while their model is difficult to prove, it does partially explain the ability of enterococci to survive in hospital environments: they have long been equipped to thrive in a wide range of challenging environments. Having a better sense of what prompted the bacteria to evolve these abilities, the researchers say, could help control enterococci as the bacteria continue to circumvent hospital infection control methods.

Article

F Lebreton, et al. Tracing the enterococci from Paleozoic origins to the hospital (link is external). Cell. DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2017.04.027 (2017)

Control of catheter associated biofilms through efflux inhibition

Pr Brian Jones, from school of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Brighton, United Kingdom will present his study on “Control of catheter associated biofilms through efflux inhibition“.

According to him: “Proteus mirabilis poses particular problems in the care of individuals undergoing long-term urethral catheterization. This organism forms extensive crystalline biofilm structures on catheter surfaces that block urine flow, leading to serious complications such as pyelonephritis, septicemia and shock. We have previously shown that efflux systems are important for P. mirabilis biofilm formation on catheters, and mutants defective in particular systems are less able to block catheters, highlighting potential therapeutic targets. Subsequently, we screened a range of existing drugs already used in human medicine to identify potential efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs). Molecular modelling indicated selected EPIs showed strong interaction with efflux systems related to biofilm formation, and these compounds were also able to attenuate P. mirabilis biofilm formation and catheter blockage in laboratory models of catheter associated UTI. Overall this suggest efflux inhibition may be a valid approach to control catheter blockage, and existing medicines have the potential to be repurposed for control of bacterial biofilm formation.”

If you are interested to know more about Phage and phage-based products, don’t hesitate to participate to Targeting Antibiotic Resistance Congress which will be held in Florence on October 2-3, 2017.
More information on www.tid-site.com

Development of Infection-responsive surface coatings for bacteriophage delivery in the catheterised urinary tract

Pr Jones from School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Brighton, United Kingdom will talk about will talk about his study on “Development of Infection-responsive surface coatings for bacteriophage delivery in the catheterised urinary tract“.

He summarizes his talk in following:

“Indwelling urethral catheters (IUC) are widely used for long-term bladder management but are often complicated by acquisition of infection. Proteus mirabilis is a particular problem in this regard, and forms extensive crystalline biofilms on catheter surfaces that obstruct urine flow and lead to serious complications such as pyelonephritis, septicaemia and shock. To address this clinical need, we have developed a novel infection-responsive surface coating for urinary catheters, which responds to elevated pH indicative of P. mirabilis infection. We demonstrate the ability of this coating to provide both a visual early warning of infection, and deliver a therapeutic dose of bacteriophage to control catheter blockage. This potentially “theranostic” coating system is a promising strategy for the deployment of phage therapy and other relevant antimicrobial compounds at local sites within the urinary tract at the exact time when the intervention is needed.”

If you are interested to know more about Phage and phage-based products, don’t hesitate to participate to Targeting Antibiotic Resistance Congress which will be held in Florence on October 2-3, 2017.

More information on www.tid-site.com