Committee

Development of bacteriophage therapy, and infection-responsive delivery mechanisms, to combat biofilm formation and blockage of urinary catheters

Nzakizwanayo photoDuring Phage Therapy World Congress 2016, Dr. Jonathan Nzakizwanayo from the Queen Victoria Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, West Sussex, as well as the School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Brighton, East Sussex, United Kingdom, will give a talk about Development of bacteriophage therapy, and infection-responsive delivery mechanisms, to combat biofilm formation and blockage of urinary catheters.

 

According to Dr Nzakizwanayo, the care of patients managed by long-term urethral catheterisation is frequently complicated by acquisition of infection. Proteus mirabilis poses particular problems in these patients, and infection with this organism leads to encrustation and blockage of catheters through the formation of extensive crystalline biofilms on catheter surfaces. The blockage of catheters leads to reflux of infected urine to the upper urinary tract and often culminates in serious conditions such as pyelonephritis, septicaemia, and shock. At present there are no effective means of controlling encrustation in long-term catheterised patients, or providing early warning that blockage may be imminent. To address this unmet clinical need, we have developed a novel infection-responsive coating for urinary catheters, that provides an early visual indication of impending blockage, and releases bacteriophage to actively combat the infection. Our preliminary data using in vitro models show that this system can provide around 12h warning of catheter blockage, and that bacteriophage can effectively control encrustation and blockage.

For more information about the congress please visit: www.tid-site.com.